Monday, December 29, 2008

Did I mention White Ibis...

For Hannibal and Leedra...

White Ibis are so common here that if never crossed my mind that there would be much interest in them. I forget that our blogging community spans the US and the globe. I hope you enjoy these shots from Crane's Roost in Altamonte Springs here in Central Florida. Don't forget to click on the photo for a closer look.

Did you Know:
A wading bird of the deep South, the striking White Ibis is frequently seen on lawns looking for large insects as well as probing for prey along the shoreline.

Their call... thanks to Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

It occurs in marshy wetlands and pools near the coast. It also occurs on mowed grass, lawns, and has become common in some city parks, where it can be found feeding alone or with other Ibis. It builds a stick nest in trees, bushes, or over water, and 2 to 5 eggs are typically laid. White ibises are monogamous and colonial, usually nesting in mixed colonies with other wading species.

This ibis feeds by probing with its long, downcurved beak. Its diet consists of various fish, frogs and other water creatures, as well as insects and small reptiles. Adults are 65 cm long with a 95 cm wingspan. They have all-white plumage except for black wingtips (visible in flight) and reddish bills and legs. The red bill blends into the face of breeding birds; non-breeding birds show a pink to red face. Juveniles are largely brown with duller bare parts; they are distinguished from the Glossy and White-faced Ibises by white underparts and rumps. Over all both sexes look alike.


Like the other species of ibis, the White Ibis flies with neck and legs outstretched, often in long, loose lines. The song of the male is an advertising hunk-hunk-hunk-hunk. The female squeals. When feeding, the birds often give a soft, grunting croo, croo, croo as they forage.

Above Research from Wiki.

The juvenile White Ibis...



White Ibis and Mallards compete for bread...

No more bread??? gotta go...

Thanks for stopping by. Remember more birds to come from my trip to Crane's Roost.
Craig

8 comments:

Leedra said...

Thanks, when I first saw them in June (naturally at Lake Seminole Park) I was so excited because I had never seen them before. I actually had to go to my trusty reference books to see what they were. Thanks for sharing them.

dAwN said...

Great Ibis shots and information...I cant wait to get to Florida for the winter! We will be leaving the cold north and heading south soon. yipeee

Ruth's Photo Blog said...

Fascinating pictures.Keep on posting the birds I don't get to see over here.
Blessings,Ruth

scot said...

Craig, throw up the Glossy Ibis Justin and I got the other day.

Stacey Huston said...

Thanks for sharing these.. I did not expect to see them eating bread along side the ducks... that was a big surprise.. Have a wonderful New Year

Tina said...

Craig,
Such a nice sunny day...ahhh I could sure use that experience right now. Your photos of the ibis are very nice esp. when you enlarge them. I love the third one where the shadow falls across his body..You are right one forgets that this web thing is so global and we don't all have such great birds at hand..thanks for sharing.

HANNIBAL said...

I can't believe just how many of the ibis's there are in your neck of the woods! Wow! Thanks for posting them!

Michele Wassell said...

I learn so much from other people's blogs about different subjects in nature, etc. I love the 3rd photo of the Ibis. They are all lovely photos.