Wednesday, April 29, 2009

Red-Bellied Woodpecker


Did you know:

Known predators:
Sharp-shinned Hawks (Accipiter striatus)
Cooper's Hawks (Accipiter cooperii)
Black Rat Snakes (Elaphe obsoleta)
Domestic Cats (Felis silvestris)
Red-headed Woodpeckers (Melanerpes erythrocephalus)
European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)
Pileated Woodpeckers (Dryocopus pileatus)
Gray Rat Snakes (Elaphe obsoleta spiloides)

Predators of adult red-bellied woodpeckers include birds of prey such as sharp-shinned hawks and Cooper's hawks, black rat snakes and house cats. Known predators of nestlings and eggs include red-headed woodpeckers, European starlings, pileated woodpeckers, gray rat snakes and black rat snakes. When approached by a predator, red-bellied woodpeckers either hide from the predator, or harass it with alarm calls. They defend their nests and young aggressively, and may directly attack predators that come near the nest.

Did you know research from Wiki.


Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Tuesday, April 28, 2009

Tufted Titmouse

I recently posted a question about "Lifer" list and really appreciate everyones feedback. Since I have no idea what birds I have seen and not seen in my life, I have decided to go with birds I have photographed. Therefore, this is a lifer I have been chasing for a while now and finially got him/her.





Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn


Saturday, April 25, 2009

Red-Bellied Woodpecker Oranges

Here are two of my regular visitors. Top left is the female Red-Bellied Woodpecker with the male stuffing himself with sweet home grown Florida oranges from Maureen's mothers yard. Mrs. M keeps us well stocked with fresh oranges for the birds. They go through about four a day. I learned this feeding technique from my dear blogger friend Abe Lincoln. He has spent many years of his life creating a nature habitat in his back yard. I hope to do the same and hope to be half as successful as he has been. Thanks for sharing your tips Abe!




Please stop by and pay Abe a visit. He has many blogs and all are very interesting.

Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn



Camera Critters

Friday, April 24, 2009

Before and After

The birds and squirrels love thier oranges. I put this out after getting home from work yesterday. I took the second photo tonight when I got home. Gone in 24 hours! Nothing like Florida oranges!





Thanks for stopping by,



Craig Glenn

Mallards?

Is this some mutted form of ducks?

I have been watching these two for the last couple of days. They don't look like the standard Mallard. Is this a new duck for me or some mixed up domestic mallard?





Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn



Thursday, April 23, 2009

What Spider?

A Big thanks to Dawn from Dawn and Jeffs Blog for identifing this spider.

Green jumping spider - Lyssomanes viridis

I am off to do some research to see if I can find some cool facts about this find.





Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

The Northern Cardinal

Not the greatest of all photo's but I almost caught this male feeding his babyluv! He keep flying away while she sat in the feeder full of food and come back in a few minutes and feed her whatever was in his mouth. It was great fun to watch. I think he loves her! Can you say "twitterpated"?



Cardinals love sun flower seeds!

They also like a bit of undergrowth in your yard as they like to forage near the ground. I Put seed on the ground as well as in the feeders and often see the Cards down with the doves eating.

I am not sure how many pairs visit my yard but the are there early in the morning and the last ones feeding at night.



Thanks for stopping by,


Craig Glenn



Saturday, April 18, 2009

Joan Bug

Look! It's a Joan bug.... errr I mean a bug for Joan. I have no idea what he is. I did some research but just couldn't quite nail the ID. So if anyone knows, please let me know and I will post some information on the little guy. I love the blue and red body. Enjoy your bug Joan!

UPDATE: Thanks the my very good friend The Muse and her very kind husband, I have an ID!!! Ladies and Gentleman, I give you the Boxelder Nymph.

Did you know:

Boxelder bugs, Boisea trivittatus, are familiar insects to most people. They are generally not noticed during summer, but often can become an issue when they try to move into homes during fall as they search for overwintering sites.



Boxelder bugs are primarily a nuisance because they enter homes and other buildings, often in large numbers. Fortunately, they do not bite people and are essentially harmless to property. When abundant, they can stain walls, curtains, and other surfaces with their excrement. Occasionally some may seek moisture and may be found around houseplants, although they rarely attack them. In the few cases when they do feed, boxelder bugs are very unlikely to injure indoor plants.


Did you know research from University of Minnesota. If you want to know more please pay them a visit.





I would also like to introduce a new Florida nature blogger to all of my friends in blogland. Her name is Carol and she has created the blog "Wildlife Around Us". There are some really nice bird photos there for all to enjoy, so please pay her a visit.



Camera Critters








Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Friday, April 17, 2009

More Anoles

The Anole action is heating up here in Central Florida!


This image comes from my brother Scooter...


Honey... they are watching again!

Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Tuesday, April 14, 2009

Bottoms up

Red-Bellied Woodpecker

Did you Know:

The most common woodpecker in the Southeast, the Red-bellied Woodpecker is a familiar sight at bird feeders and in backyards. Yes, its belly is covered in a light red wash. But this woodpecker is easier to spot by the red on the back and top of its head.


The Red-bellied Woodpecker competes vigorously for nest holes with other woodpeckers, in one case even dragging a Red-cockaded Woodpecker from a nest cavity and killing it. But it is often evicted from nest holes by the European Starling. In some areas, half of all Red-bellied Woodpecker nesting cavities are taken over by starlings.


Stores food in cracks and crevices of trees and fence posts. The woodpecker does not appear to defend its caches from other birds or mammals.



The male Red-bellied Woodpecker has a longer bill and a longer, wider tongue tip than the female. These adaptations may allow the male to reach deeper into furrows to extract prey and may allow the sexes to divide up the resources in one area.




Did you know research from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Monday, April 13, 2009

Brown Alole

For Joan in South Africa. I spent some time in the back yard on Saturday looking for bugs for Joan. I wasn't the only one looking. I didn't catch a single bug worth posting but I did catch a bug catcher! Sorry Joan, I will keep trying to catch a bug for you. :)


The Brown Anole, Anolis sagrei (or Norops sagrei) also called the Bahamian Anole is a lizard native to Cuba and the Bahamas. It has been widely introduced elsewhere, and is now found in Florida and as far north as Southern Georgia, Texas, Taiwan, Hawaii, and other Caribbean islands. Its introduction in the USA has altered the behavior and triggered a negative effect on populations of the native Green Anole, Anolis carolinensis, also called the Carolina Anole. This species is highly invasive. In its introduced range it reaches exceptionally high population densities, is capable of expanding its range at an exponential rate, and both out competes and consumes many species of native lizards.



The Brown Anole (also called Bahamian Anole in many pet stores) is a slender lizard reaching about 18 cm in length. This anole has the ability to change coloration to match its surroundings. They can change pigmentation from brown, light tan, rust, to black. Males and females differ somewhat in coloration: males have a dark stripe down their backs, females a light stripe. The mature males weigh about twice that of females. As in other anoles, the male has a brightly colored throat fan, called a dewlap, which is yellow or reddish-orange. They are territorial and the dewlap is used in territorial displays. Anoles have expanded toe pads that allow them to climb to smooth surfaces.



The brown anole feeds on insects such as crickets, grasshoppers, roaches, spiders, mealworms, and waxworms. It may also eat other lizards, such as the green anole, and lizard eggs. They also eat fruits such as strawberries. They will also usually eat their molted skin.



Unlike the green anole which prefers foliage, the brown anole is found often on the ground. They are athletic creatures that run fast, and jump many times their length. They can also climb straight up almost any surface at blinding speed. The brown anole gets used to humans and can be studied at close range.
Research from Wiki.
Hope you enjoy Joan,
Craig Glenn


Friday, April 10, 2009

Indigo Bunting

According to Wikipedia:

The Indigo Bunting is a small bird, with a length of 11.5–13 cm (4.5-5 in). It displays sexual dimorphism in its coloration; the male is a vibrant blue in the summer and a brown color during the winter months, while the female is brown year-round. The male displays brightly colored plumage during the breeding season to attract a mate. Nest-building and incubation are done solely by the female. The diet of the Indigo Bunting consists primarily of insects during the summer months and seeds during the winter months.

Did you know:
The Indigo Bunting migrates at night, using the stars for guidance. It learns its orientation to the night sky from its experience as a young bird observing the stars.


Experienced adult Indigo Buntings can return to their previous breeding sites when held captive during the winter and released far from their normal wintering area.

The sequences of notes in Indigo Bunting songs are unique to local neighborhoods. Males a few hundred meters apart generally have different songs. Males on neighboring territories often have the same or nearly identical songs.

Indigo and Lazuli buntings defend territories against each other in the western Great Plains where they occur together, share songs, and sometimes interbreed.


Sound

Song a musical series of warbling notes, each phrase given in twos. Call a sharp, thin "spit." Flight call a high buzz.»
Did you know research from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Thanks for stopping by,
Craig Glenn

Saturday, April 4, 2009

Darby's Spring Shave










Camera Critters

Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn