Sunday, May 31, 2009

Great Blue Heron






Thanks for stopping by,
Craig Glenn

Thursday, May 28, 2009

Exciting new lifer

I started this post with a request for help to identify a new lifer for me. Special thanks go out to Bird Girl, Hannibal, and Steve B, for their expert identification!

My mother, father and grandma are down from South Georgia visiting us this week. While Maureen and I are at work they sit on the porch and watch to birds and squirrels come to eat in the back yard. I have lost count of how many feeding stations we have now. They noticed a bird they could not identify and from their discription I had no idea what they were talking about. Daddy said it had red on it's tail and a yellow breast with dark gray or black on it's head and wings. When I came home from work yesterday there he was and I grabbed the camera and took these shots.

The Great Crested Flycatcher is lifer number ???! I really do need to count these and make a list. I do know that it is a lifer for me as I count them now. I have chosen to count birds that I have photographed as my lifer list since I have no idea how many and what birds I have seen in my life. So some day soon I will lay them all out and make a Photo Lifer List.

Did you Know:

A treetop hunter of deciduous forests and suburban areas, the Great Crested Flycatcher is easier to hear than to see. The only eastern flycatcher that nests in cavities, it often includes snakeskin in the nest lining.

The Great Crested Flycatcher makes the same "wee-eep" calls on the wintering grounds that it makes in summer.


The Great Crested Flycatcher is a bird of the treetops. It spends very little time on the ground, and does not hop or walk. It prefers to fly from place to place on the ground rather than walk.


Many, but not all, Great Crested Flycatcher nests contain shed snakeskin. Other crinkly materials, such as plastic wrappers, cellophane, and onion skin, may be used.

Breeds in open deciduous woodlands, old orchards, riparian corridors, wooded swamps, parks, cemeteries, and urban areas with large shade trees.
Food includes: Insects, other invertebrates, some small fruits.

Nest Description:
Nests in cavities, typically filled with trash and nest placed on top. Nest made of leaves, hair, feathers, rootlets, string, trash, small twigs, bark, paper, and shed snakeskin. Will use nestbox.




Did you know research from All About Birds.

Thanks for your help,


Craig Glenn






Camera Critters

Wednesday, May 27, 2009

Gopher Tortoise

Here is "honey my baby" with a nice little Gopher!


Did you know:


Out of all the tortoises in this world, there is one that stands out among the others in the aspect of hospitality - the Gopher Tortoise. The Gopher Tortoise is also known as the Nature's Landlord and the Landlord of the Sand hills. The reason behind their name is that the Gopher Tortoise will dig beautiful burrows which will also be the home of 360 other different species of animals like the Gopher Frog.

Because of the tortoise's hospitality, and how they share their burrows with other animals, they are an important part of the ecosystem as without them, many of the animals would not have shelter, and would soon die off. In a way, you can say that the Gopher Tortoise and the other animals form a symbiotic relationship where the others will benefit.

The Gopher Tortoise does not look quite different than others of its own species. It has strong limbs, and wide flat claws to help them dig the burrows. They average 10 inches long, so they aren't necessarily that large, and weigh up to 10 pounds. While they may share hospitality with other animals, they are not big creatures at all. On top of that, their claws are protected by scaled, and they are protected by large shells from their predators.

Isn't he beautiful?

Did you know research from Associated Content.

Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn


Thursday, May 21, 2009

More Beach Birds

I need help again. Can you ID these birds? I know Dawn knows!

Click to enlarge for a better view...





Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Monday, May 18, 2009

Laughing Gull

A day at the beach yeilds a new lifer for me.












Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Spicebush Swallowtail

I took these photos on my lunch walk at work. There is a nice patch of Lantana between two buildings in a path through the hedge row. I stop here often to see what I can see.

Did you know:

The Spicebush Swallowtail (Papilio troilus) is a fairly black swallowtail found in North America. It is the state butterfly of Mississippi.




This primarily black swallowtail is normally found in deciduous woods or woody swamps, where they can be found flying low and fast through shaded areas.

The Spicebush Swallowtail is found only in the Eastern US and extreme southern Ontario, with occasional strays in the American Midwest and even Cuba.

Adults can be identified by their spoon-shaped tails and by their bright green (male) or iridescent blue (female) hind-wings. Ivory spots may be visible on the forewings, and orange spots may appear on the hindwings. Wingspan may be 3 to 4 inches.


Research from Wikipedia.

Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn



Friday, May 15, 2009

Blue Jay






Thanks for stopping by,
Craig Glenn

Tuesday, May 12, 2009

A great place to Bee

I love spring. I hope you enjoy my bee shots.



Check out the pollen on his legs!



I took this one from Bee-hind!




Thanks for stopping by,
Craig Glenn

Saturday, May 9, 2009

A critter named Mallard




Camera Critters



Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Thursday, May 7, 2009

Brown Thrasher in the city

I tried to capture all of the elements of the city with a touch of nature.



Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn