Sunday, January 24, 2010

Chimps at Busch Gardens

Found these handsome fellows at Busch Gardens Tampa Florida.




Chimpanzees make tools and use them to acquire foods and for social displays; they have sophisticated hunting strategies requiring cooperation, influence and rank; they are status conscious, manipulative and capable of deception; they can learn to use symbols and understand aspects of human language including some relational syntax, concepts of number and numerical sequence; and they are capable of spontaneous planning for a future state or event. Research from Wiki.


Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Sunday, January 10, 2010

Unknown Goose

The Greylag Goose

Photographed at Lake Eola in downtown Orlando Florida.




I have no idea what kind of goose this is. Do you?

UPDATE: My friend Tom (the Fishing Guy) from This is my blog identified my goose as a Greylad Goose.  Thanks Tom!

This species is found throughout the Old World, apparently breeding where suitable localities are to be found in many European countries, although it no longer breeds in southwestern Europe. Eastwards it extends across Asia to China. In North America there are both feral domestic geese, which are similar to greylags, and occasional vagrants.

The Greylag is a large goose, 74–84 cm (29–33 in) long with a 149–168 cm (59–66 in) wingspan and a body weight of 2.3–5.5 kg (5–12 lbs). It has a large head and almost triangular bill. The legs are pink, and the bird is easily identified in flight by the pale leading edge to the wing. It has a loud cackling call, kiYAAA-ga-ga, like the domestic goose.

The western European nominate subspecies, A. a. anser, has an orange-pink bill and is slightly smaller and darker than the pink-billed Asian race, A. a. rubrirostris. Eastern European birds are often intermediate in appearance.


Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Saturday, January 9, 2010

The Common Moorhen

Photographed at Lake Eola in downtown Orlando Florida.


(click to enlarge)

It is a distinctive species, with dark plumage apart from the white undertail, yellow legs and a red facial shield. The young are browner and lack the red shield. It has a wide range of gargling calls and will emit loud hisses when threatened.


This is a common breeding bird in marsh environments and well-vegetated lakes. Populations in areas where the waters freeze, such as southern Canada, the northern USA and eastern Europe, will migrate to more temperate climes. This species will consume a wide variety of vegetable material and small aquatic creatures. They forage beside or in the water, sometimes upending in the water to feed. It is often secretive, but can become tame in some areas. Despite loss of habitat in parts of its range, the Common Moorhen remains plentiful and widespread.

The nest is a basket built on the ground in dense vegetation. Laying starts in spring, between mid-March and mid-May in N hemisphere temperate regions. About 8 eggs are usually laid per female early in the season; a brood later in the year usually has only 5-8 or even less eggs. Nests may be re-used by different females. Incubation lasts about three weeks. Both parents incubate and feed the young. These fledge after 40–50 days, become independent usually a few weeks thereafter, and may raise their first brood the next spring. When threatened, the young may cling to the parents' body, after which the adult birds fly away to safety, carrying their offspring with them.

Research from Wikipedia.


Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Friday, January 8, 2010

The American Coot

Photographed at Lake Eola in downtown Orlando Florida.







The American Coot (Fulica americana) is a bird of the family Rallidae, inhabiting wetlands and open water bodies. About 16 inches (40 cm) in length and weighing 1.4 lb (0.65 kg), adults have a short thick white bill and white frontal shield, which usually has a reddish-brown spot near the top of the bill between the eyes. From up close, a dark band can be distinguished at the billtip. The body is grey with the head and neck darker than the rest of the body. Their legs are yellowish, with scalloped toes rather than webbed feet. Their chicks have black bodies with bright red head and beak, and orange plumes around the neck. The call is a high-pitched squeaking honk somewhat like a goose's but more hollow sounding.

Research from Wikipedia.


Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Thursday, January 7, 2010

The Great Blue Heron

Photographed at Lake Eola in downtown Orlando Florida.


(click to enlarge)

The largest North American heron, with a head-to-tail length of 91–140 cm (36-55 in), a wingspan of 167-201 cm (66-79 in), and a weight of 2–3.6 kg (4.4-8 lbs),flight feathers, red-brown thighs, and a paired red-brown and black stripe up the flanks; the neck is rusty-gray, with black and white streaking down the front; the head is paler, with a nearly white face, and a pair of black plumes running from just above the eye to the back of the head. The feathers on the lower neck are long and plume-like; it also has plumes on the lower back at the start of the breeding season. The bill is dull yellowish, becoming orange briefly at the start of the breeding season, and the lower legs gray, also becoming orangey at the start of the breeding season. Immature birds are duller in color, with a dull blackish-gray crown, and the flank pattern only weakly defined; they have no plumes, and the bill is dull gray-yellow.

Research from Wikipedia.

Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Wednesday, January 6, 2010

Black Swan

The Black Swan




Black Swans are primarily black feathered birds, with white flight feathers. The bill is bright red, with a pale bar and tip; and legs and feet are greyish-black. Cobs (males) are slightly larger than pens (females), with a longer and straighter bill. Cygnets (immature birds) are a greyish-brown with pale-edged feathers.


A mature Black Swan measures between 110 and 142 cm (43-56 in) in length and weighs 3.7–9 kg (8.1-20 lbs). Its wing span is between 1.6 and 2 metres (5.3-6.5 ft). The neck is long (relatively the longest neck among the swans) and curved in an "S".

The Black Swan utters a musical and far reaching bugle-like sound, called either on the water or in flight, as well as a range of softer crooning notes. It can also whistle, especially when disturbed while breeding and nesting.

The Black Swan is unlike any other Australian bird, although in poor light and at long range it may be confused with a Magpie Goose in flight. However, the black swan can be distinguished by its much longer neck and slower wing beat.

Research from Wiki.


Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn


Tuesday, January 5, 2010

White Throated Sparrow

Photographed in Tifton Ga Christmas 2009





Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Monday, January 4, 2010

Cardinals in the sand

I shot these Cardinals in my parents backyard.  They were picking seed from the sand that mama throws out for them.  Of course the sparrows were there to help.  As you can see I still have some fine tuning to do to get these in focus.








(click photo's to enlarge)


Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Sunday, January 3, 2010

Grey Squirrel up up and away

I knew you wouldn't believe me so I took a picture.  There was a flying squirrel at my parents house in Ga over the holidays.  He swooped down, grabbed a nut and *swish* away he flew.  Seriously!





Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Saturday, January 2, 2010

Canadian Geese in South Ga

I captured these geese at Lake Say-Hi in Tifton Ga.


 
 
 
 
(click on photo to enlarge)


Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Friday, January 1, 2010

Turkey Vulture in flight

Turkey Vulture
Photographed in South Ga
12/28/2009


 
 
 
(click to enlarge)



Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn