Sunday, July 25, 2010

Eastern Pondhawk Female

Eastern Pondhawk
Female



Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Saturday, July 24, 2010

Four Spotted Pennant Dragonfly

Four Spotted Pennant
Brachymesia Gravida



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Craig Glenn

Friday, July 23, 2010

Mallard Talking

Mallard Duck
Yakety Yak, don't talk back!

(click image to enlarge)

Yakety Yak

"Yakety Yak" is a song written, produced, and arranged by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller for The Coasters and released on Atlantic Records in 1958, spending seven weeks as number one on List of number one rhythm and blues hits and a week as number one on the Hot 100 pop list. This song was one of a string of singles released by The Coasters between 1957 and 1959 that dominated the charts, one of the biggest performing acts of the rock and roll era.

The song is a "playlet", a word Stoller used for the glimpses into teenage life that characterized the songs Lieber and Stoller wrote and produced. The lyrics describe the listing of household chores to a kid, presumably a teenager, the teenager's response (yakety yak) and the parent's retort (don't talk back), an experience very familiar to a white teenager of the day. Leiber has said the Coasters’ portrayed “a white kid’s view of a black person’s conception of white society.”

The serio-comic street-smart “playlets” etched out by the songwriters were sung by the Coasters with a sly clowning humor. The screaming saxophone of King Curtis filling in hot, honking bursts in the up tempo doo-wop style. The group was openly theatrical in style -- they were not pretending to be expressing their own experience.

The threatened punishment for not taking out the garbage and sweeping the floor in the song's humorous lyrics:

"You ain't gonna rock and roll no more,"

And the refrain:

"Yakety yak, Don't talk back."

Beneath the humor, Leiber and Stoller songs often made incisive points about American culture, largely by lampooning racial stereotypes.


Source Wiki. Photographed by Craig Glenn at Cranes Roost Park.

Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Thursday, July 22, 2010

Monarch Butterfly

Monarch Butterfly
(Danaus plexippus)
Female


(click image to enlarge)

Did you Know:

The Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) is a milkweed butterfly (subfamily Danainae), in the family Nymphalidae. It is perhaps the best known of all North American butterflies. Since the 19th century, it has been found in New Zealand, and in Australia since 1871 where it is called the Wanderer. In Europe it is resident in the Canary Islands, the Azores, and Madeira, and is found as an occasional migrant in Western Europe. Its wings feature an easily recognizable orange and black pattern, with a wingspan of 8.9–10.2 centimetres (3½–4 in). (The Viceroy butterfly has a similar size, color, and pattern, but can be distinguished by an extra black stripe across the hind wing.) Female Monarchs have darker veins on their wings, and the males have a spot called the "androconium" in the center of each hind wing from which pheromones are released. Males are also slightly larger.

The Monarch is famous for its southward migration and northward return in summer in the Americas which spans the life of three to four generations of the butterfly.

Did you know research from Wiki. Photographed by Craig Glenn in my front yard on Lantana.


Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Tuesday, July 20, 2010

More Fiery Skipper Photo's

Fiery Skipper







Did you know:

All adult true skippers have six well developed legs. Their eggs are tiny, usually less than .1mm. Most skipper caterpillars are green and tapered, and the neck appears constricted. The caterpillars weave silk and leaves into a daytime shelter for protection. Most pupate in loosely woven cocoons. The chrysalises are often coated with a powder or bloom. Chrysalis and caterpillars may overwinter.

Skipper butterflies can be divided into five subfamilies:

  • Pyrginae, or spread-wing skippers. These butterflies bask with their wings spread open flat, although there are a few that sit with the wings folded over their back. The cloudy wings sit with their wings partly open. Most spreadwings are patterned in gray, black and white. Caterpillars feed on many different types of plants, especially legumes.
  • Grass Skippers, subfamily Hesperiinae constitute the largest grouping, and perhaps the most challenging for those seeking to identify specimens. They are smaller than the spread-wing skippers, and many are patterned with yellow, orange and black. These erratic flyers sit with their forewings and hind wings at different angles - I think the configuration resembles an F-15 Eagle fighter jet. Grass skipper larvae feed mostly on ... guess what? Yep. Grasses.
  • Giant Skippers, subfamily Megathyminae includes the largest skippers. These are rare butterflies, even where there host plants, the Agaves and Yuccas are common. They are very fast and powerful flyers.
  • Skipperlings, subfamily Heteropterinae includes only a handful of small species living in the north and west. They lack the narrow extension (apiculus) of the antenna club. Many skipperlings sit with the wings open flat. They are often lumped into the grass skipper family. Note: Some skippers are called skipperlings but do not actually belong to this subfamily.
  • Firetips, subfamily Pyrrhopyginae. Only one species of this mainly subtropical group inhabits North America: the Atraxes skipper.
Did you know research from Cirrus Image. Photographed on 7/14/2010 by Craig Glenn in my front yard on Lantana.

Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Sunday, July 18, 2010

Great Blue Heron up Close

Great Blue Heron

Ardea herodias


(click image to enlarge)

Did you know:


The tall, long-legged great blue heron is the most common and largest of North American herons.

Great blue herons are waders, typically seen along coastlines, in marshes, or near the shores of ponds or streams. They are expert fishers. Herons snare their aquatic prey by walking slowly, or standing still for long periods of time and waiting for fish to come within range of their long necks and blade-like bills. The deathblow is delivered with a quick thrust of the sharp bill, and the prey is swallowed whole. Great blue herons have been known to choke to death by attempting to swallow fish too large for their long, S-shaped necks. Though they are best known as fishers, mice constitute a large part of their diet, and they also eat insects and other small creatures.

Great blue herons' size (3.2 to 4.5 feet/1 to 1.4 meters) and wide wingspan (5.5 to 6.6 feet/1.7 to 2 meters) make them a joy to see in flight. They can cruise at some 20 to 30 miles (32 to 48 kilometers) an hour.

Though great blue herons hunt alone, they typically nest in colonies. They prefer tall trees, but sometimes nest in low shrubs. Females produce two to seven eggs, which both parents protect and incubate. Chicks can survive on their own by about two months of age.

The all-white color morph found in the Caribbean and southern Florida is often called the great white heron, but it is in fact the same species.


Did you know research from National Geographic. Photographed by Craig Glenn at Cranes Roost Park in Uptown Altamonte.

Saturday, July 17, 2010

Mallard Hen

Mallard

(click image to enlarge)

How pretty is this lady?


Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Little Blue Heron with the goods

Little Blue Heron


(click image to enlarge)

M, Sara, and I were taking a walk around Cranes Roost Park and doing a little birding. This Little Blue Heron snatched up some bread and took off.


Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Fiery Skipper

Fiery Skipper

Hylephila phyleus (Drury, 1773)



(click image to enlarge)


I learned something new today! This is a Skipper. I never heard of such a thing. Well I must admit the first thing I thought of was "The Skipper and Mary Ann", ya know, Gilligan's Island??? Anyway, I took this photo of a Skipper on the Lantana in M and I's front yard but had no idea what it was. So I email the photo to the world renowned "Bug Lady" who told me straight away it was a Skipper! She made me look it up though and I think I have identified it correctly as a Fiery Skipper. You can learn more about the Fiery Skipper here.

Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

White Ibis




White Ibis up close and personal at Cranes Roost Park in Uptown Altamonte!


Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Black Swan


Did you Know:

Bearing

When swimming, black swans hold their necks arched or erect, and often carry their feathers or wings raised in an aggressive display. In flight, a wedge of black swans will form as a line or a V, with the individual birds flying strongly with undulating long necks, making whistling sounds with their wings and baying, bugling or trumpeting calls.

Nesting and reproduction

Generally, black swans nest in the wetter winter months (February to September), occasionally in large colonies. A typical clutch contains 4 to 8 greenish-white eggs that are incubated for about 35–40 days. After hatching, the cygnets are tended by the parents for about 6 months until fledging, and may ride on their parent's back for longer trips into deeper water.

A black swan nest is essentially a large heap or mound of reeds, grasses and weeds between 1 and 1.5 metres (3-4½ feet) in diameter and up to 1 metre high, in shallow water or on islands. A nest is reused every year, restored or rebuilt as needed. Both parents share the care of the nest. Like other swans, the black swan is largely monogamous, pairing for life (about 6% divorce rate). Recent studies have shown that around a third of all broods exhibit extra-pair paternity. An estimated one-quarter of all pairings are homosexual, mostly between males. They steal nests, or form temporary threesomes with females to obtain eggs, driving away the female after she lays the eggs.

Did you know research from Wiki. Photograph taken by Craig Glenn at Lake Eola Park in downtown Orlando.


Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Monday, July 12, 2010

Anhinga

Anhinga


Did you know:

The Anhinga (Anhinga anhinga), sometimes called Snakebird, Darter, American Darter, or Water Turkey, is a water bird of the warmer parts of the Americas. The word "anhinga" comes from the Brazilian Tupi language and means devil bird or snake bird.

It is a cormorant-like bird with an average body length of 85 cm (35 in), a wingspan of 117 cm (45 in), and a weight of 1,350 g (48 oz). It is a dark-plumaged piscivore with a very long neck, and often swims with only the neck above water. When swimming in this style the name Snakebird is apparent, since only the colored neck appears above water the bird looks like a snake ready to strike.

The Anhinga is a member of the darter family, Anhingidae, and is closely related to Indian (Anhinga melanogaster), African (A. rufa), and Australian (A. novaehollandiae) Darters.

Unlike ducks, the Anhinga is not able to waterproof its feathers using oil produced by the uropygial gland. Consequently, feathers can become waterlogged, making the bird barely buoyant. However, this allows it to dive easily and search for underwater prey, such as fish and amphibians. It can stay down for significant periods.

When necessary, the Anhinga will dry out its wings and feathers. It will perch for long periods with its wings spread to allow the drying process, as do cormorants. If it attempts to fly while its wings are wet, it has great difficulty getting off the water and takes off by flapping vigorously while 'running' on the water. Anhinga will often search for food in small groups.

Did you know research from Wiki.


Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Sunday, July 11, 2010

Great Egret


Did you Know:

The Great Egret is a large bird with all-white plumage that can reach one meter in height and weigh up to 950 grams (2.1 lb). It is thus only slightly smaller than the Great Blue or Grey Heron (A. cinerea). Apart from size, the Great Egret can be distinguished from other white egrets by its yellow bill and black legs and feet, though the bill may become darker and the lower legs lighter in the breeding season. In breeding plumage, delicate ornamental feathers are borne on the back. Males and females are identical in appearance; juveniles look like non-breeding adults. It is a common species, usually easily seen. It has a slow flight, with its neck retracted. This is characteristic of herons and bitterns, and distinguishes them from storks, cranes, ibises and spoonbills, which extend their necks in flight.

The Great Egret is not normally a vocal bird; at breeding colonies, however, it often gives a loud croaking cuk cuk cuk.

Did you know research from Wiki. Photographed by Craig Glenn at Cranes Roost Park on 7/10/2010.


Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Saturday, July 10, 2010

Little Blue Heron

Did you know:

The Little Blue Heron is actually white for the first year! Here are some cool facts.

Cool Facts

  • The Snowy Egret tolerates the close proximity of white Little Blue Herons more than that of dark Little Blue Herons. A white Little Blue Heron catches more fish in the company of Snowy Egrets than when alone. This relationship may be one reason why young Little Blue Herons stay white for a year.
  • Another advantage of white plumage is that young Little Blue Herons are more readily able to integrate into mixed-species flocks of white herons, thus gaining a measure of protection against predators.
Did you know research from All About Birds. Photograph taken by Craig Glenn in Maitland Florida.


Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Thursday, July 8, 2010

Swallowtail Butterfly

(click to enlarge)

Need help with ID...

We have Lantana flowers in both the backyard and front. These plants are great for attracting butterflies! Butterfly plants add a beautiful touch to your environment and bring nature to you.

Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Sunday, July 4, 2010

Osprey

(click to enlarge)


Did you Know:

The Osprey (Pandion haliaetus), sometimes known as the sea hawk or fish eagle, is a diurnal, fish-eating bird of prey. It is a large raptor, reaching 60 centimetres (24 in) in length with a 2m wingspan. It is brown on the upperparts and predominantly greyish on the head and underparts, with a black eye patch and wings.

The Osprey tolerates a wide variety of habitats, nesting in any location near a body of water providing an adequate food supply. It is found on all continents except Antarctica although in South America it occurs only as a non-breeding migrant.

As its other common name suggests, the Osprey's diet consists almost exclusively of fish. It has evolved specialised physical characteristics and exhibits unique behaviour to assist in hunting and catching prey. As a result of these unique characteristics, it has been given its own taxonomic genus, Pandion and family, Pandionidae. Four subspecies are usually recognised. Despite its propensity to nest near water, the Osprey is not a sea-eagle.

Did you know research from Wiki. Photo taken on Sanibel Island Florida.

Bird Information
Bird of Prey



Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Saturday, July 3, 2010

Great Blue Heron

The Great Blue Heron




(Click to enlarge)


Did you know:

The primary food for Great Blue Heron is small fish, though it is also known to opportunistically feed on a wide range of shrimps, crabs, aquatic insects, rodents, other small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and small birds. Herons locate their food by sight and usually swallow it whole. Herons have been known to choke on prey that is too large.[9] It is generally a solitary feeder. Individuals usually forage while standing in water, but will also feed in fields or drop from the air, or a perch, into water. As large wading birds, Great Blue Herons are able to feed in deeper waters, and thus are able to harvest from niche areas not open to most other heron species.

It feeds in shallow water or at the water's edge during both the night and the day, but especially around dawn and dusk. It uses its long legs to wade through shallow water, and spears fish or frogs with its long, sharp bill.


Did you know research from Wiki. Photo's taken at Cranes Roost Park in Altamonte Springs Florida.

Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Friday, July 2, 2010

Tricolored Heron


(click to enlarge)

Did you know:

The Tricolored Heron (Egretta tricolor) formerly known in North America as the Louisiana Heron, is a small heron. It is a resident breeder from the Gulf states of the USA and northern Mexico south through Central America and the Caribbean to central Brazil and Peru. There is some post-breeding dispersal to well north of the nesting range.

Tricolored Heron's breeding habitat is sub-tropical swamps. It nests in colonies, often with other herons, usually on platforms of sticks in trees or shrubs. In each clutch, 3-7 eggs are typically laid.

This species is about 56 cm (22 in) long, with a 96 cm (38 in) wingspan and weighs 350 g (12 oz). It is a medium-large, long-legged, long-necked heron with a long pointed yellowish or greyish bill with a black tip. The legs and feet are dark.

Adults have a blue-grey head, neck, back and upperwings, with a white line along the neck. The belly is white. In breeding plumage, they have long blue filamentous plumes on the head and neck, and buff ones on the back.

Tricolored Heron stalks its prey in shallow or deeper water, often running as it does so. It eats fish, crustaceans, reptiles and insects.

Did you Know Source

Photo's taken at Cranes Roost Park in Altamonte Springs Florida

Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn