Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Oleander Moth or Polka-Dot Wasp Moth









The Polka-Dot Wasp Moth (Syntomeida epilais) is a species of moth thought to be native to the Caribbean. The species is also called the Oleander Moth after the Oleander plant, from which its young feed. Like most wasp moths, these moths are day fliers.
And they prefer neotropic areas, to which they are native. The North American subspecies is S. epilais jucundissima, which is locally common in all areas of Florida, and has been seen as far north as Savannah, GA.

Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

Botany Photographs from Lyonia Preserve









Photographs taken by Craig Glenn at Lyonia Preserve in Volusia County Florida.

About Lyonia Preserve:
Lyonia Preserve is a 360-acre joint project of Volusia County's Land Acquisition and Management Division and the Volusia County School Board to restore and maintain scrub habitat. Since 1994, restoration efforts have removed overgrown sand pines and opened up the understory, creating the characteristic bare sand areas with low-growing vegetation preferred by scrub species.

Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Sunday, November 20, 2011

Florida Scrub Jay Part I

Scrub Jay







This is the first in a series of post talking about the Florida Scrub Jay. Also, a chance to share with everyone my first sighting and encounter with this really cool bird!

Did you know:

The Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens) is one of the species of scrub-jay native to North America. It is the only species of bird endemic to the U.S. state of Florida. Because of this, it is heavily sought by birders who travel from across the country to observe this unique species. It is known to have been present in Florida as a recognizably distinct species since at least 2 mya; possibly it is derived from the ancestors of Woodhouse's Scrub-Jay, the inland forms of the Western Scrub-jay.

It is 28 cm (11 in) long, and weighs 75–85 g (2.6–3.0 oz). It has a strong black bill, blue head and nape without a crest, a whitish forehead and supercilium, blue bib, blue wings, grayish underparts, gray back, long blue tail, black legs and feet.

Did you Know Source

Photographs taken at Lyonia Preserve by Craig Glenn.

About Lyonia Preserve:
Lyonia Preserve is a 360-acre joint project of Volusia County's Land Acquisition and Management Division and the Volusia County School Board to restore and maintain scrub habitat. Since 1994, restoration efforts have removed overgrown sand pines and opened up the understory, creating the characteristic bare sand areas with low-growing vegetation preferred by scrub species.


Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Thursday, November 17, 2011

Eastern Carpenter Bee Male

Click image to enlarge
Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Wednesday, November 16, 2011

Grasshopper Rescue

Here is a little grasshopper I rescued from the pool today.

Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn

Saturday, November 12, 2011

Honey Bee on Lantana

Honey Bee


I have enjoyed all the bees this year on our Lantana! The Honey Bee's are so cute and make a great photography subject.

Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn
HireCraig.com

Monday, November 7, 2011

Eastern Carpenter Bee

Eastern Carpenter Bee - Male





Did you know:

Eastern Carpenter Bee, male (Xylocopa virginica). The Eastern Carpenter Bee is often mistaken for a large bumblebee species, as they are similar in size and coloring. They are important pollinators, and sometimes bore holes in wood dwellings. They use chewed wood bits to form partitions between the cells in the nest. The most visible physical difference between this species and a bumblebee is the abdomen.

Eastern carpenter bees have a shiny black abdomen, with the only yellow hair present being at the base next to the thorax, while bumblebees have a very fuzzy abdomen, which in some species has large areas of yellow hair across the middle (this is visible and obvious). The female eastern carpenter bee also has a much broader head than bumblebees. Eastern carpenter bees can be sexed at a glance. Males have a patch of white cuticle on the face, as opposed to females, whose faces are black. Males are unable to sting. Female carpenter bees make nests by tunneling into wood. They make an initial upward hole in an overhang. Then they make one or more horizontal tunnels.

Unlike termites, carpenter bees (also called woodcutters) do not eat wood. They discard the bits of wood, or use them to make partitions (walls) inside the tunnels of their nests. The tunnel functions as a nursery for brood and the pollen or nectar upon which the brood subsists.


Did you know information source: http://www.sciencephoto.com/media/102182/enlarge

Thanks for stopping by,

Craig Glenn
HireCraig

Saturday, November 5, 2011